Under Silvio Varviso in Atlanta,Georgia in 1963. I present a glorious (somewhat distant) Tosca with Milanov,Tucker, and Colzani.  I miss them so much!

Direct download: Tosca_Atl.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:46 PM

Very famous soprano. Speeches, Exc.From Manon With Richard Crooks(1935-6),Exc.from Rondine w.Mario Chamlee (1934)

Direct download: Bori.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:45 AM

Cossotto and Bergonzi sure light up the stage in this 1970's Cavalleria under Christopher Keene. Also featured are Anselmo Colzani,Jean Kraft, and Nedda Casei (Lola)

Direct download: CavCos.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:12 PM

Oberon,Gotterdamerung,Consul,Macbeth  SUPERB!!!!!!!

Direct download: Ingeb.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:42 PM

1 Lauritz.Melchior                    Walkure "Walse"  (get a stopwatch)

2. Mario Filippeschi     PIRA!!!!

3. Renata Scotto                         Luisa Miller aria

4. Vera Galupe-Borszkh    In questa reggia    (Ira Siff -better than most Turandots)

5. Piero Cappuccilli                        Attila Cab...B FLAT!!!

6.  Joseph Schmidt                            Ma Parri

7. Diana Soviero                              Mefistofele aria

8.Christine Goerke               "Come scoglio" (Cosi)

9. Sergei Lemeshev              May Night Aria

10. Georges Thill                    Saffo aria

11.Maria Caniglia                   "Pace"

12. Marilyn Horne                   "Or la tromba"

13. Joseph Rogatchevsky     Oberon aria

14. Antonio Cortis                    PIRA

15. Lucine Amara, Richard Tucker,Martial Singher   Hoffmnn Trio

16. Meta Seinemeyer            Liebestod  (great  singer,died at 33)

Direct download: 20_comp.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:30 PM

Léon Escalaïs (August 8, 1859, Cuxac-d'Aude – November 8, 1940, Cuxac-d'Aude) was a prominent Gallic tenor, particularly associated with French and Italian heroic roles. His lean, nimble and powerful voice was noted for the ease and brilliance of its upper register.

Life and career

Born Léonce-Antoine Escalaïs, he commenced his vocal studies as a young man at the Music Conservatory of Toulouse, where he won prizes for singing and opera performance. He continued his studies at the Paris Conservatory with two well-known teachers of the day, Crosti and Obin, prior to making his professional debut at the Théâtre du Château (Paris) in 1882, in Sardanapale by Jean-Baptiste Duvernoy.

Escalaïs was offered a contract by the Paris Opéra. His first appearance with the Paris Opéra at the Palais Garnier occurred in 1883, as Arnold in Guillaume Tell. (Arnold would become one of his signature roles.)

Two years later, he sang for the first time at the Théâtre de la Monnaie in Brussels, and he made his debut at La Scala, Milan, in 1888. He left the Paris Opéra in 1892 after a dispute with management and accepted engagements in Dijon, Lyon, Marseille and Italy. Among the taxing roles which he undertook were Eléazar in La Juive, Robert in Robert le diable, Raoul in Les Huguenots, Vasco in L'Africaine and the title parts in Le Cid and Sigurd.

Between 1892 and 1908, Escalaïs sang more often in Italy (this is wrong, he sang once in Milan and it was a fiasco) than he did in his native land. He added to his repertoire such Verdi roles as Manrico in Il trovatore, Radamès in Aida and the title part in Otello' (Escalais never sang Otello)'. Consequently, he was sometimes described as "the French Tamagno" (after Francesco Tamagno, the Italian heroic tenor).

Escalaïs rejoined the Paris Opéra in 1908. The following year, he sang as a guest artist at the New Orleans Opera House. These would be his only performances in the United States. He retired from the stage in 1912 while still in good voice and was appointed to the Legion of Honour by the French Government in 1927. In retirement, he gave private singing lessons. One of his students was José Luccioni, an outstanding dramatic tenor of the 1930s and '40s. Escalaïs died in Cuxac-d'Aude during the Second World War, aged 82.

What a VOICE!!!!!!   Wm.Tell, Robert le Diable, Huguenots,Prophete,Africaine,Juive,Jerusalem,Trovatore,Aida, Otello

Direct download: Escalais.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:01 PM

Olimpia Boronat (1859 or 1867[1] – 1934) was an Italian operatic coloratura soprano, noted for her performances of the soprano roles in the bel canto repertory.

Boronat was born in Genoa, and made her debut either there or in Naples during 1885. She sang around the world, particularly the Spanish-speaking world, but was particularly associated with Russia; she first sang there at St Petersburg in 1894. She married a member of the Polish aristocracy, and retired from the stage for six years from 1896 to 1902. After her hiatus, she sang initially in Russia; it was not until 1909 that she returned to her native Italy to sing.

Boronat was noted for a voice of great beauty and clarity, and exceptional technical ability, coupled with sensitive musicianship. She was particularly associated with the roles of Rosina in The Barber of Seville, Violetta in La traviata, Elvira in I puritani, and Ophélie in Hamlet.

After her retirement, Boronat founded a singing school in Warsaw.

Puritani,Don Pasquale,Rigoletto, Martha, Huguenots,Sonnambula, Olga (Gianelli),Nightingale, 2 Ave Marias (Bach)

....and speaking of BACH,I hope my fuguing BACH gets better. If you do not get the pun, you are not missing an anything)

Direct download: Boronat.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 2:00 AM

Superb Voice!! Pagliacci,Chenier,Zaza, Faust

Direct download: Danise.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:13 PM

Bless Dear Licia,as we hear Suor Angelica,Rondine,Onegin, Louise

Direct download: Licia_Mem.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:36 PM

Tebaldi arias  Louise,Forza,Wally,Forz.Boheme,Lescaut,Chenier,Mefistofele,Adriana,(Alli Live)

Exclude the small print.

I have been ill (BACK!!~) .Hope I do more.

Direct download: Tebaldi3.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:50 PM


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